DOG 
CUSTODY

 

 


Even the most responsible of owners can face complaints over their pet’s behaviour and be liable to prosecution for barking, injury to people or damage to property.

Whether you own a large or small dog, however calm and friendly it is, the Dangerous Dogs Act still applies to you. Whether you’re in your neighbour’s garden, a public space or even your own home, it’s your responsibility to control your dog.

Under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991, you could face charges you might not expect. For example, if your dog attacks a guide dog, you could be prosecuted for a hate crime. Or, if your dog upsets livestock, a farmer could be legally entitled to kill them.

    With so many loopholes to navigate, speaking to a solicitor is essential. And with so much at stake, you’ll need to work with experienced lawyers who can create a strategy that succeeds in court.

    Under the Act, it’s illegal for a dog to be ‘out of control’ or to bite or attack someone. The legislation also makes it an offence if a person is worried or afraid (the term is ‘reasonable apprehension’) that a dog may bite them. So it’s important to ensure that your dog is kept under control at all times and in all places.

    In the UK there are a number of specific breeds that are illegal to own, including:

    • Dogo Argentino
    • Fila Brasileiro
    • Japanese Tosa
    • Pit Bull Terrier

    Has your dog been seized as a dangerous dog? Whether your dog is that of a banned type is dependent on the way it looks, rather than that of the breed or name. We understand that allegations of owning an illegal breed can be a difficult time as a dog owner.

    Our team are experienced in defending allegations of illegal breeds. We can assist to help with the return of them.

    Contact us for guidance and a no obligation initial appointment on 01792 468684 or email enquiries@pgmsolicitors.co.uk

     

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